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In this episode, Chuck Anderson explores the power of branding with Anika Jackson, a seasoned branding expert and VP of PR and operations for a leading marketing agency. Anika shares valuable insights into understanding customer personas, refining brand messaging, and the significance of intentional partnerships for business growth.

Guest Bio:

Anika Jackson is a branding expert with extensive experience in marketing and promotion. As the VP of PR and operations for a marketing agency, she specializes in helping small businesses and minority entrepreneurs establish their brand identity and visibility through integrated marketing strategies.

Key Points Discussed:

– Importance of understanding customer personas and targeting specific segments before reaching a broader audience (06:12)

– Developing brand messaging, tone of voice, and identity before considering customer personas and social media channels (14:30)

– Necessity of fixing brand-related issues and establishing a well-structured ecosystem before pursuing big opportunities (21:45)

– Significance of collaboration, outside perspectives, and intentional partnerships in business (32:19)

– Offering a free 30-minute strategy session and the significant impact minor tweaks can have on branding (41:55)

Must-Read Book Recommendation:

“Secrets of the Sfrakhkar” by Eliza Reed and “Be Different or Be Dead” by Roy O’Singh

Guest’s Website:

To learn more from Anika Jackson’s expertise, schedule a free consultation with her …

https://calendly.com/yourbrandamplified/30min

Was this episode helpful?

Please leave us a review and subscribe to the show to be notified of future episodes.

Until next time, keep moving forward!

Chuck Anderson,

Affiliate Management Expert + Investor + Mentor

http://AffiliateManagementExpert.com/

Transcript
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Hello everybody and welcome back. This is the Creative

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Collaboration Show with Chuck Anderson. And This is

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the show where we, we talk to business owners,

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entrepreneurs, and companies on a growth

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path out there trying to bring their mission to the world in the way

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that they're doing it, and we like to bring on guests who are experts

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in different areas of, You know, growing and

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scaling businesses. And today, I have Anika

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Jackson with me here today, and she is a

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branding And I'm not gonna say much more

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about, you than that, because I really want

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you to, You know, you we'll we'll get you to tell your story, and

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I think we're gonna also define what what is it what does branding

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actually mean, and I think that's a That's a great place to start this episode.

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So first of all, Annika, thank you for being here. This is amazing.

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I'm it's my pleasure to be here, Chuck. Thank you for having me. So

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that's the light introduction. So I always like people to tell their own story.

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So you you wanna go ahead and just let everybody know who you are

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and I'll try to keep it short. Yeah.

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I'm Annika Jackson, and, presently, I am also a podcast

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host. I have a podcast called Your Brand Amplified, And I also

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have a podcast and speaker series that I produce and cohost

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for USC Annenberg, so University of Southern California.

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Don't know where everybody is, so I wanna make sure they get the right USC,

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for, our one of our master's programs in digital

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media management, and that is called MediaScape. We interview digital changemakers.

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I am a VP of PR and operations for a

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marketing agency. I have an online program, and I'm a

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professor also at USC. So I do I wear a lot of hats, but they

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are all very connected. And I started out in

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this field in Kansas, growing up in Lawrence,

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Kansas, starting to promote music,

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DJs, clubs, because I love to go out, and it was a way for

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me to get free tickets and free entry into things and invite my friends

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along. And it just parlayed and snowballed from there into working

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for various marketing agencies, ad

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agencies, In house for magazines.

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I've I've had a very diverse career, and it's landed me back,

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after a few twists and turns in the Los Angeles area where

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I'm doing the things that I mentioned now. Mhmm. I love that

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origin story because, you know, it just started off as, you know,

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Something you wanted to do or something you're interested in. And who

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knows what's where that's going to take you. Exactly. It's kind of

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how I got started in this as well. I mean, a friend invited me over

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for dinner and, you know, and introduced me to affiliate marketing for

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the very first time. And, next thing I know,

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20 year plus years later, I'm still doing that, which is,

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which is a lot of fun. You just never know, you know, what doors are

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gonna open, when you when you go through them. And so that's,

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that's great. And so so so we wanna talk about branding in

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this in in this episode, and I know this is This is something in the

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agency work that you do, and and in your private, you

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know, consulting that you do. Branding is

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the, You know, the the thing that you're, you

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know, I would say known for. And so so so tell us a little

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bit about, like, kinda who are you working? First of all, what is branding? I

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mean, let's do that first, and then and then we'll kinda get, you know, and

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then we'll get into who needs it. Right? Well and I can kind

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of combine those. It's really interesting because I

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sometimes have small businesses, clients who are starting up or who want to

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shift from 1 industry to another come to me, And they have

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their idea and they say, I have a brand. What they really mean is they

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have a logo. They have a website. Maybe they've preserved a name on social

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media. That that's brand identity. It is not the

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ethos of a brand. A brand is so much deeper. A brand

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is the thoughts and feelings that are associated with the name of your

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company. When people see your logo, what do they feel?

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Right? And so it's the collective kind of impression

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a perception that potential customers have

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of who you are and what you do in the marketplace. And that could be

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a personal brand. It can also be a business. And so it's

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it's really interesting, and that's why I love the space because, as

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you mentioned, people usually think, oh, if I just Create these materials,

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then I can start my company, but you really have to go back. And this

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is something that I teach in my brand amplifier program, Going through the

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steps of creating your brand blueprint. So who are you? How do you

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show up for your purpose, your vision, your mission, your

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values? How do you want people to perceive you? What kind of

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language are you gonna use? Right? Yes. The identity pieces,

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the colors, the taglines, the comments, all

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those things make up what your brand is.

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I love that. I particularly

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love how you said it's it's really about how we

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want people to perceive us and how we want them to feel.

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And that is, that is a element of the

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conversation I really don't hear enough.

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It like you said, people are thinking about it in terms of their

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logo and their website, And I even know

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people who call themselves branding experts who are really, you know,

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website designers, But it's not it's more than that. Right?

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It's, you know, I always like to think of it is as what do

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I want to be known for And how do I want people to think of

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me? Is that kind of along the lines of what you're saying, or is it

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more than that? No. I mean, that's if you're gonna boil it all

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down, That's what it is. I I feel like we are

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all here for a reason, whether it's in our personal lives or in our business

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lives, And that purpose should be the driver behind everything you

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do, and somebody should be able to identify

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where where you stand in the marketplace against your competition Because they

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should be able to see what your values are, what your purpose is,

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how you show up. Yeah.

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I love that. So in your world, who are who who

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let's describe the kind of person who's coming to you for this kind of

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help. I mean, what are, You know, I would I'd say 2 parts to it.

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Like, what is the struggle? Maybe it's they they've already

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decided on that. They wanna do some branding, and they're trying to figure it all

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out. Maybe it's Maybe it's even earlier than that. And then what's sort of

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the desired outcome that they're hoping to achieve? So let's you know,

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who who do you find yourself working with And who's coming to you in

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this regard? And, I think it's there's a few different

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customer personas that I have for my brand, and it

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would include small businesses, particularly start ups. I work with a lot of

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minority entrepreneurs who are just starting out and trying to establish

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their businesses, whether that means they're working on funding streams,

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they wanna start a nonprofit as an offshoot of a brand they've Started.

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They just they wanna be seen for who they are and what they're trying to

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put out. So we always start with no matter where we are in the

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process, Somebody wants PR. They want social, whatever.

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I take it back to brand and figure out, do we know who you are?

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Do we know who you are compared to your competitors? Well, you

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know, we do a lot of analysis to see, like, what keywords are people

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saying when your name comes up or when your category comes up. What are the

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trends? What are people saying about your competition? So that then I can

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figure out what a good strategy is to make sure that that brand is

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being seen in the proper light. And so that's when we get into the the

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strategies and tactics of integrated marketing. But, yeah, I work with a wide

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variety, everything from my students. I teach PR and branding

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to the Brand Amplifier for Entrepreneurs program where I walk through the steps

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that I take with my retainer clients to get them to understand

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their brand before we put together a plan. I've worked with the

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retainer clients and then mostly entrepreneurs, but also workforce

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development and education. And so for every client, They they

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each have a unique challenge that we need to solve for, but a lot of

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times, it does come down to they know who they are

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Potentially. Right? They might need some help with that, but they are not being

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seen. And so how do we make sure that they're more visible and that

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their brand is representative of exactly how they wanna show up in the market. Mhmm.

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So that might mean we do some brand refresh work, tweaking messaging.

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You know, they might have a great purpose, mission, and vision, but they just might

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need a little bit of update in the verbiage, an update in

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the tagline that they're using, An update in, it could be

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that they need updated brand identity because they're a 40 year old brand and

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haven't done anything Since, you know, in the 4 past 4 years

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to update. So we we look at that. We really see

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from a holistic perspective what needs to be

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fixed or solved for or made a little bit shinier and better, and

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then we can take them to the next level. And a lot of

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it is that somebody has a perspective. They need a little bit more brand

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building, and then they need to be able to be seen whether that's

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through digital advertising, whether it's through their social media,

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whether it's through podcasting or other types of interviews. And so

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that way, we can then drive more people to see who they are, and then

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they get more recognition, and that leads to sales. I love

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that. Speaking of challenges, what are what are some of the challenges

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that these, you know, the, you know, the companies

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or the people that you're working with are are experiencing right

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now that's causing them to look at their brand as maybe the next

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thing that they need to To tackle or to to

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improve? I would say a big

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one is for particularly for clients because we work with a lot of

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adult education, so community college systems, career technical education,

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fields that are really growing, where we really need people.

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Right? And there's a lot of great jobs. So it's making sure

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that they are standing out against their competitors in a region

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and that they're getting the right students in and that they have the right

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employers on the other side that want to employ these students.

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So a lot of times, it is about making sure that they are attracting the

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students that they really want to the right programs, to get the right jobs,

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to make the money that will make a difference for their families, and and also

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regionally fulfill the needs, whether it's manufacturing,

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retail, you know, auto tech, Whatever it is in that

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region in terms of the economic factors. On the other

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side, it would also be sometimes they wanna attract more teachers.

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They don't have enough teachers for the number of students. You know,

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it could be that they need more English as a second language teachers or they

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need more people who are Helping people get their high school equivalencies,

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which is I don't know what if it's the same exact thing in Canada,

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as it is here in the States. Right? And then for

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other brands, it is that they have a product. It's really viable,

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but they might need some help being comfortable representing their

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brand. Because I find a lot of entrepreneurs wanna stay

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behind. They wanna, like, oh, my my brand's gonna do all the

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talking. But in order for you to get brand recognition, you have

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to be seen as the industry expert, the thought leader, the person

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who really understands and has a great Story as well.

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Right? The storytelling. Why did you create this brand?

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What compelled you? What need did you see in the market that now is going

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to help Be a solution for other people.

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You know, one of the things I like to think about after the challenges is

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what some of the mistakes are that That that are making and I think you

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said one right there is that, you know, they're they're trying to let their

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brand do all of the work too early.

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And they're not putting their selves out as much.

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And when we think about some of the bigger brands out there, I mean they've

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been around for know, 50 to a 100 years,

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they've done the branding work and it's branded. Right? So

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we, you know, but early stage, It's

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not so we have to really get it out there. So, is there

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any more to that mistake? And are there any other mistakes that you're seeing people

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make when it comes to their branding? Another

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one is maybe they haven't gone through the whole

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exercise of creating a Brand blueprint. Mhmm. So a lot of

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times, it's all about cohesion. Right? So if somebody

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goes to your social media and to your website or hears you speak

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On an interview, it should all look and feel the same. And

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a lot of times, people forget about social media engagement and

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connecting to your customer prospective customer through that. So they

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might have somebody more junior answering people's

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questions, and that person might not have the right tone of voice

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to represent the brand properly. And that's definitely a mistake we've seen and

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a very big missed opportunity. It's something that you have

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to spend time and intention on, but it's really important that you

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have that you're being, responsive Whether it's somebody

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messages you through your website, through your socials,

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whatever it is, right, that you're being responsive and that you're being responsive in a

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way that's going to give them Great information, relevant information right away

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and that's also in the tone of voice that represents who you are.

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And again, that tone of voice is gonna contribute to what you were saying earlier,

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and that is how do we want people to perceive us

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And how do we want them to feel when they

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experience Yeah. Our brand, our company, or

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Ourselves as as the founder or leader or spokesperson or,

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you know, the face of the company. I mean, and

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I think of some of my favorite brands, so many of them do have

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not they're not just a company, but there's there's there's a leader

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behind that company that we can also, So,

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associate with I always think about Wendy's, right, and Dave

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Thomas. I mean, you know, it's not it's not just a company that

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sells burgers. Right? I think of

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Dave Thomas when I think of Wendy's, right? And so,

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and I think that people ultimately want To do business with

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people, you know, the the people who are behind, you

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know, the companies. Right? Yeah. They they want the know,

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Trust and, you know, no trust and like factor. Mhmm. And

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so how much of that how much of that personality or how how

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important is it to have a A a person

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or a personality behind a company

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and its, you know, the brand that they're putting out there, in the

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marketplace? I think it's more and more important every day, especially with the

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younger generations. They really demand authenticity.

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They want to see, Do you is the person behind the brand,

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do you hold the same values that they hold? Right? Because that's part of their

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buy in. If They are very into environmentalism,

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but then they find out this brand that they love is funding

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horrible things and polluting, and that the person that is

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behind the brand is giving money to people to make sure that they can pollute,

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like, they're not going to support that brand anymore. So

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it's it's really important. It really is tied in, particularly since most

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businesses and organizations are small businesses. That's the

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backbone of America, whether it's United States or

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Canada. Right? And so people want

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to see who it is that they can form a relationship with you,

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so they can go, okay. This is something I can put my my money towards.

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This is somebody I can get into business with.

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Amazing. So what would be some of your,

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tips or advice for anyone listening in right now who It's like,

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okay. We've we've kind of defined the branding and its purpose and

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what its ultimate goal is. What are some of the next steps,

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or what are some of the things they need to be Thinking about next in

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terms of of, you know, getting their brand on

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point and achieving what they want out of it. Well, Well,

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I mentioned something a little earlier. So I'm you know, it's a really,

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short synopsis, I guess, but I talked about customer personas.

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And it's really important to think about who your ideal customers are so that

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you know where to find them because they're not going to live on every social

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media channel. Right? They're not gonna be everybody.

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Eventually, you might want to reach everybody, but you need to start with more specific

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examples. So I love to walk through exercises where we think about

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Who we are as a brand, what our messaging is, what our tone of

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voice is, are we playful, are we sophisticated, Are we

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irreverent? You know? What what how do we wanna come across when we're speaking to

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somebody? Because that's language you're gonna wanna put into your brand bible along

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with your identity and your colors, But then you get to your customer persona.

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So then how are you speaking to the customers and where are they living? What

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are their motivations? What are things that they're scared of?

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You know, how much money do they have to spend on our product or service?

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And so you rarely get into the heads, the psychological, the psychographics,

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the demographics of your consumers, Create some profiles. And

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then I always advise, yes, reserve every social media channel, but

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by no means do you need to post on everything. Post where your

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customers are most likely to live. Right? And so start thinking

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about what how what messages you wanna put out, content pillars. How do you

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wanna educate them and bring them along? How do you wanna share the your

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why with this audience? Mhmm. And so and that it it's not

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just social. It's What you're writing on your website. It's how you're showing up in

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the press. And then I have a lot of I mean, there's so many

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tips I can give, but one thing I also recommend is Go out and

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start talking about it, and don't be afraid.

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In PR, I always like to say we You know, just like a

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baby, you you usually crawl before you walk, before you run.

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So start with smaller platforms. Maybe look for an

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online Publication that's catered towards your audience. If it's

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like a women you know, you can look up, women

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women's owned magazines or women in business magazines, and you can find small

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ones that will take submissions. So maybe start there.

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Start writing out who you are, Then start start getting on some

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smaller podcasts. Then you start getting on bigger things and start getting bigger

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press. And it's a great way to build up your confidence in speaking and being

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the voice and the face of your brand. It's

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a great way to hone your messaging so that when you get the big

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opportunities, the big stages, that you really know how to dial

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in what you're going to say. And that's one of the best things that

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I I love to do because a lot of times, that that's the other thing

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people come and say, I have a brand. I'm ready for PR. I wanna be

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in Forbes. So, Paul, let's let's take a step back. Let's make sure that we

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have everything all these other things done first, You know that but it

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when somebody, when you do get informed that when somebody goes to your

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website, that they're going to see that you are exactly who you say you are.

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And then when they go to your social media, same thing. And when they download

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your product or they purchase your product, same thing. So we really wanna make

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sure that The whole ecosystem is really well put

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together and then start taking those baby steps. And sometimes then it

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goes boom really fast. Sometimes it takes a little longer, But

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it it all works really well. And if you take the

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time and intentionality to do it right the first time,

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then you're not going to make a lot of the mistakes. Right? Because you're really

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gonna know who you are. You're gonna know how what you stand for. You're going

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to know That maybe the those persons or that funding stream isn't your

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ideal client, your ideal sponsor, your ideal funder,

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And this other person is. And so I think it's really important because

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as you're creating your brand and being showing who you are,

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You're really able to figure those things

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out and show up authentically. And it's not about trying to

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be authentic. It's just that you are. Mhmm. I think the,

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the goal of trying to get into Forbes is a great a great example and

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you you talked about taking that step back. How often when

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you take that step back do you find that,

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oh, there's some additional work that we need to do here versus,

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Oh, okay. Yeah. This all looks good. Let's go for it. Yep.

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There's always additional work. There's always something that to be done. And to your

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point, some of the other things that we see a lot with clients are they

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need something fixed with their brand. They also

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honestly usually don't have a lot of time, And they might not have big budgets,

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so we have to figure out what's the framework, how do we stair step to

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get you where you wanna go. Mhmm.

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And further to that, k, so if you identify these things that need to

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be fixed, then my goal is to get into Forbes.

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I've I've heard so much, you know I I think entrepreneurs get tired

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sometimes, and business owners get tired. And it's like, okay. That's good enough. I'm

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just gonna go for it. But what would be the downside of just going for

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it versus fixing those things before

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applying to, you know, to get into Forbes?

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Yeah. Well, are you showing up the way you really wanna show

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up? Right? That's the biggest question. Mhmm. If you get

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into Forbes, are people going or Do all of your links work on your

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website so that people can purchase easily? Is it easier for them to

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find the button to click through to join your mailing list or to get more

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information a product or service. So if you haven't

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fixed those things and you start getting traffic, people are

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immediately not going to trust your brand. So then it doesn't really matter what you

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say in the next article or the next thing or the

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advertising campaign you do because people will already have a bad

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taste about your brand. Yeah. It

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sounds like that's the the worst thing that can happen is that they actually do

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pick you up and put you out there, But put you out there

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with things that are either broken or

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not really, you know, Conducive to your overall goal and

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what you you wanna get. And that yeah. I mean, not to rush it.

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And just with all of this, just in listening to you, it really sounds

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like There there is benefit to, to working

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with someone versus doing it all yourself and I just know so many

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business owners and entrepreneurs who, You know, they're they're they

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do too much themselves. And, you know, my listeners know I'm big

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on collaboration and partnerships and finding somebody

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to work with. So, you know, 2 things,

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I think, you know, with this. 1 is

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what are the benefits to Working

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with somebody on the branding versus trying to do it all

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yourself and piece it all together. And, and and

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then also, like, what, You know, and and we'll take that further because,

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you know, how do how does, you know, collaborating in your

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business play a role in in in what you wanna And

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so so it's kind of 2 things there. 1 is on the branding, but also

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just in collaboration overall, finding someone to work with.

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It's anytime that somebody else can look at what you're doing and

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give you another perspective, I think is fantastic. A lot of times, I've

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worked I've worked with people who Have you been been in business 20 years

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and been in the same business and just wanted said, you know, something's not

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quite right? So we tested out some things, went through some of the

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exercises, and they realized they were not going after the right audience

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and that their messaging was drawing in an audience they didn't want. So they were

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able to course correct a little bit. Mhmm. Right? And so it's the beauty.

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Even myself as a marketer and brander and

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publicist, I need other people to take a look and say, okay. What do you

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what am I missing, or what do you see when you look at this? Because

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I You it's better to have those eyeballs. Otherwise, it's like,

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the cobbler with no shoes, right, or the emperor with no clothes.

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So I think it's always really good to get an outside perspective. It doesn't have

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to be cost prohibitive to do so. Right? There are a lot

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of great people you can work with, And collaboration is

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everything. There are you know, you can say there are a

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1000000 online courses you can take or programs you can buy. We'll teach you how

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to do x y z, but they're gonna be 1 piece of the puzzle, not

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the whole puzzle. And if you can get somebody who's an expert in their field,

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Why not work with them? I've I've been, talking

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to a lot of people and making a list of who the experts are that

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I wanna work with next year, and the year

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beyond and you know? Okay. What's the budget? So I need to figure

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out what point I'm going to be able to afford their services, but I'm identifying

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that now so that I can work towards that because I know

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they're gonna do it a lot better than I can.

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Yeah. And and that is so true. I mean,

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as a reformed do it yourselfer,

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I can say, you know, things things get done

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so much easier when when I get people who are

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Skilled in the way that they are to do what they

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do because, you know, it, a, it takes that thing off my plate,

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but, b, They may have a unique skill set where

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I'm kind of okay, but they're great. Yeah. Exactly. And they

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can do things in a fraction of the time. And and I

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think, you know, so many of us, business owners, entrepreneurs,

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Whether it be for profit or nonprofit or, you know,

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educational, sometimes we we we do too much. We do

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too much. And Collaboration and partnership is I really

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think is the the key. What do you look for when you

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when you're looking for, someone to collaborate within your

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business. Well, I I

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think we've covered quite a bit of it. I I look for I mean, I

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do a lot of research. I mean, for instance, I'm collaborating with you

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right now and it's been a year since I heard a podcast that you were

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on, but what you said to the point of

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branding resonated with me. It showed me who you were.

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I went and did a little bit of research. I reached out to you after

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hearing you on somebody else's podcast. So

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that that really does work for anybody who's listening. Oh, yes.

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Definitely get on shows. And then, and then you and I

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had conversation, and then I've been on your list. And I've come to a few

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of your workshops, and now we're working together. Mhmm. Right? So I

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wanna make sure that the people I'm working with aren't just Trying to

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be overtly sales y and just get my money in the door.

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Right? I wanna work with people who I know are really genuine, authentic, really love

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what they do. And then I know that what they're so much

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smarter in that area than I am that it would be

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I'll I'll end up spending more money and making more mistakes

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if I don't work with them. And I've made that mistake before.

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So I think that story of how you and I connected is

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is a great example of, look, you don't have to rush into things, and we

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don't have to, you know, go and, oh, it's the

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Black Friday special, so we need to go and, we need to go and take

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advantage of this right now. We there's so many you know, so

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much slick marketing, You know, offers that are just it

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just feels like we're gonna miss out. And what I really hear

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you saying is, you know, you do your due diligence and, you know,

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Bring people in intentionally and not just because there's a great

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offer, in in front of them. And I'm much the same way

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in in how I collaborate with people. And To add to

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what you said, I think another great test is, you know,

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when you compare what somebody is

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offering now And what they were offering a year ago,

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is it the same thing or is it completely different? And I

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think We used to use this in advertising all the time when we

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were, analyzing our competition

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is how long have they been advertising that thing? Has it been a

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week, a month, or has it been several

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years? And I think that people who are really solid

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don't change that much. They keep offering,

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you know, who they were a year ago or 2 years ago is the

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same Because what they do works versus

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always looking for the new offer, the new thing, oh, I've got

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this new program. And I've worked with enough coaches

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and experts to know when there's a new program, the new program

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almost always, With some exceptions, because sometimes there is inspiration

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or some new thing that can definitely come online,

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but so often it's Motivated by

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the previous stuff that didn't work. Oh, interesting.

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Yeah. It's Something I'm gonna continue to watch and

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study. Right? But, but I I think consistency

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sells. Yeah. And Branding, when when you brand your

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you're not gonna change your brand every month. Right? And so that that's definitely gonna

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add to the consistency. So, Now we

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big on collaboration and partnership. We see you as somebody

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who's awesome to collaborate with As, you know, especially with

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everything that we've talked about here and I think I would

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highly encourage anyone who, You know, if your branding

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isn't working for you or if you have questions and you're trying to figure out

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like how can my branding contribute to a better

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result, I think a great thing for you to do is to reach out to

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Annika, and we've got her links right beneath this video and in the

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podcast show notes. What's the best way to connect with you? Do you

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do you have, like, a freebie or do you book a call or what what

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is it that you do? Yeah. I I offer a free 30 minute strategy

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session that they can book right on my Calendly. That's the easiest way.

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And in 30 minutes, you'd be surprised we can get so much done.

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I I when even when I'm teaching, I do office hours with my

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students, and I've had students who work at agencies come back and say, I have

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a big Proposal for Whole Foods. Here's our product, and

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we'll just take half an hour and walk through okay. Let's look at the

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products other products. Are the differentiators between what you're offering?

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How do we make that a compelling offer for Whole Foods? And so I

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use this And it's really easy and it you know, little tweaks in

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language, little little tweaks here, little tweaks there. It doesn't necessarily mean that

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you need to blow up your brand completely. And so that's a really great place

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to start, and I love I'm so passionate. Like, I love teaching,

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and I love sharing with people. So Happy to jump on

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with anybody. They can schedule right at that link, and,

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it's never a better time than now. And there's no I'm not a sales

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y person, so There's no obligation. Absolutely. Like, do

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it because it's a good fit for you. And, I think if

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you're listening to us still at this point that What we've been talking

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about resonates with you, so, so take that

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next step. And, and then, you know, have that

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Call with Anika and then email me. Let me know. How did it go? What

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did you learn? How did it make a difference in your business? And

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I know in the conversations you and I have had,

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you know, it it makes a makes a difference on on both

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sides. So so, and and So you're

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definitely now in our list of people to collaborate

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with. Yay. So Look, you

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know, we could go on, we could do an entire workshop, we could

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do an entire one day event just on this topic.

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Before we run out of time and we want to bring this

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episode to a close, I want to ask you because so much

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Of this journey of being a, a business

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consultant, a business owner, an investor, it's

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been as as much as it's been a business growth

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exercise, it's also been a personal growth exercise. And I've

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learned so much from, courses and mentors and

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books. And so I wanna ask you,

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if there was 1 book, and I know it's hard to just recommend 1,

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But if there was just 1 book that you would recommend to our listeners

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as a must read or a next read, which one would you

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recommend? And I do I did bring 2 books.

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Nice. Okay. Share 2. Go go for it. Well, 1 is by Eliza Reed, the

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first lady of Iceland. It's called Secrets of the Sfrakhkar. Is

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a name for, extraordinary women. And so it's about

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Iceland's extraordinary women and how they're changing the world. And so that's more of an

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inspirational, for me, book to think about how people change the

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world and what what is their special spark and magic. The other

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one is by a Canadian, Roy O'Singh, and it's called be

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different or be dead. And he was an executive

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at TELUS and took it to $1,000,000,000 in revenue

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company. So he he but through audacious

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leadership. So he really talks about don't Do things within the

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box. Think about other ways to do things, other approaches

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in servant leadership, and he it's a really great informative book. I'm actually

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giving copies to all of my students, in my class

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tomorrow. But yeah. So so that's one that I think is a

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really good book for anybody to read who's thinking about How they want

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to structure their company, their business, not

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the physical or the, you know, the structure, the operational structure,

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but how you want to show up and how you wanna do things. That will

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really make a difference, create compelling narratives and offers,

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and get you to $1,000,000,000 in sales. Amazing.

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I love those recommendations for a couple of reasons. Number 1, I

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they're they're both in alignment with what I care deeply about,

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and that is our businesses should be world changing

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or should maybe not the right word, but could be. I mean, there's so

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much good needs to be done in the world, and I, you know, we're

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we're very pro, social entrepreneurship.

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How do our companies contribute to a better Society,

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community, country, world, etcetera, and both of those

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books I think, you know, are so in alignment with that And I've never heard

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of either of them. I've you know, so, yeah.

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Wow. So I've not only are we gonna put the link beneath this video

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and in the in the podcast show notes there for anyone else who wants to

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check them out. I'm gonna check those out as well. And,

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that thank you so much for those recommendations. And and so,

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and I can tell that they're both very personal to you, which is which is

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wonderful as well. Anika, this has been great. I mean, this there's

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been we've covered So much ground in a short period of time and I know

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there's more that we could do. I highly recommend that people do reach out to

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you and connect with you. As we bring this episode to a close,

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is there any final piece of advice or words of wisdom you wanna leave with

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our audience? Well, when when when you come on

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my show, I always ask my last question isn't booked. It's what do you have

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a favorite quote or mantra or motto? And mine is be

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kind whenever possible. It is always possible in the Dalai Lama.

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And I that's one of my values of my personal and

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professional brands, And it's something we we can all use a little more

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kindness these days. We can always use a little more

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of thinking about what somebody else might be going through instead of just

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reacting and being gentle with each other. So I'll just leave it

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with that. I felt every word of that. So be kind

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whenever possible, it's always possible, those are great words

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to end this episode by. So Anika, thank you. And

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to our listeners, thank you for being here as well, and I

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sincerely hope that this has been inspiring for you. I know

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you're on your journey of of taking your,

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enterprise, your business, your big idea to the world and

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And and you're gonna change the world with what you're doing, and you might just

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be 1 good partnership or collaboration away from

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that big result or that big impact that you are looking,

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to make. So keep moving forward. Keep being awesome,

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and, we'll see you on the next one. Thank you,

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everybody. Thank you, Anika. This has been Chuck Anderson with the Creative

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Collaboration Show.

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